Latest supported Mac OS X Game editors?

Questions about the content creation procedure go here, including using Forge, Anvil, or other editors, or operating emulators like Basilisk II.

Latest supported Mac OS X Game editors?

Post Jan 3rd '15, 00:22

Hi,

I am on Mac OS X 10.8.5 and am considering updating to Yosemite (10.10) and am wondering if the mapping tools and Aleph One engine will be supported?

I'm specifically interested in knowing if the following apps work ok on Yosemite:

    Weland 1.4.1
    Atque 1.1.1
    Marathon Infinity w/Aleph One Engine 1.1

Any help is greatly appreciated. :)
User avatar

dustu

Post Jan 3rd '15, 03:28

Those all work for me in 10.10.1.

Aleph One relies on hardware gamma to set the brightness, which is no longer available in 10.9+. So, you won't be able to set the brightness. There's a workaround in this bug report: http://sourceforge.net/p/marathon/bugs/577/
User avatar

treellama
Pittsburgh

Post Jan 3rd '15, 15:03

Thank you SO much for your reply treelama! I super appreciate it! :)
User avatar

dustu

Post Jan 5th '15, 14:55

treellama wrote:Aleph One relies on hardware gamma to set the brightness, which is no longer available in 10.9+.


Ever get the feeling that the guys at Apple just arbitrarily change the API to annoy 3rd-party devs?
ChristTrekker

Post Jan 12th '15, 18:12

ChristTrekker wrote:Ever get the feeling that the guys at Apple just arbitrarily change the API to annoy 3rd-party devs?

Apple makes money on hardware and loses money on software. Dropping backward compatibility and old APIs makes OS X development cheaper; the costs are shifted off of Apple to third-party developers instead, who have to write more code to support both old and new OS X versions. Faced with this choice, many developers will drop support for old OS X releases, because it's too expensive or time-consuming without Apple's help.

When users can't run third-party software because their own OS X machine is too old, they're encouraged to upgrade, which might mean another hardware sale in Apple's pocket. So that's a second way Apple can make money from this strategy.

New APIs don't make money directly, but they can attract developers to move to (or stick with) OS X development. From what I gather, a lot of the new APIs are developed for use in the built-in apps (Mail, Safari, Finder), so adding them is relatively cheap; plus you can recoup money by dropping any old APIs the new ones replace. Apple has to develop and improve those built-in apps anyway, because people won't buy a computer without a good web browser or email client, and selling computers is the goal.

Microsoft has a completely different business model, which means their approach is different too. They make money selling Windows, and the more copies of a version you sell, the more profitable it is. So, they sold XP as long as enough people bought it to keep the support costs in the black. They make money when people upgrade, and new shiny keeps users from migrating to Mac or Linux, but that's not as strong an incentive as it is for Apple, who makes the entire computer's worth of profit from every upgrade. So new versions of Windows come out less frequently than new versions of OS X.

The Linux ecosystem makes money in a more roundabout fashion, and there's no one company driving all the progress. So, backward compatibility and API churn can come down to whether a volunteer steps up to support something, or by mutual agreement between various distros, or by the personal ethics and philosophy of a project leader.
User avatar

Hopper


Return to Editors, Emulation, Etcetera



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users