Using Transparency in doors, walls, etc.

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Using Transparency in doors, walls, etc.

Post Jan 9th '15, 18:30

Hi!

I don't understand transparancy at all. For example, I specifically don't understand what is meant by transparent sides for textures that have black in them. How do I create them? Is it done in Weland or in Visual Mode? If Visual Mode, how? I look in Weland and they are transparent. I'm confused.

I've tried a bunch of different combinations in weland for solid and transparent wall and I can't get anything to work. I've also combined that with different affects in Visual Mode and none of them work either.

Here's one example of what I did:

I created a small room offset from a hallway. I added a liquid (vertical slide) to the back wall of the small room. then I attempted to add a wall with textures that have black in them (transparent?) in front of the water and no matter what I do, I can't get the wall to display the liquid behind the door. Just appears as though I'm replacing the water whenever I try to add the door in 'front' of the water.

Can someone help with this?

Thanks!!
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dustu

Post Jan 9th '15, 19:24

Full sides can only have one texture on them. For walls that have nothing behind them, this should be an opaque texture. If you want a transparent side, you'll need to make a polygon in front of the one with the opaque texture; then you can apply a transparent texture to the side at the intersection of those two polygons.
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treellama
Pittsburgh

Post Jan 10th '15, 04:09

A "transparent line" is any line that is shared by two polygons (it's blue in Weland). To apply a texture to that line in Visual Mode, you change your texture mode from "solid" to "transparent" and rather than applying a texture on the wall you're looking at, it will apply a texture to the nearest transparent line. The black parts in the textures will be invisible, and you can see through the texture.
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RyokoTK
Saint Paul, MN

Post Jan 10th '15, 08:46

There's not much to add to what treellama and RyokoTK said, but just to come at it from a different angle:

Aleph One has the concept of the void: what to draw when no texture information is specified.* You might expect that in the absence of texture, the game would show the landscape, like in some other engines.

But Aleph One doesn't work that way. The void is colored** black by default. In the old days, you could set the color of the void in the game's preferences.

That's why you've seen black patches on the walls of your maps: what you're seeing is the void. In a properly constructed map (that isn't using it to create some kind of novel effect), you should never see the void.

* This ties into the concept of subtractive modeling: you're not adding walls to empty space, you're hollowing a space out of a solid mass. This mass is the void. It's important to grasp this when making your first pillar.

** If the game didn't draw anything over the void, other textures & whatnot would bleed into it as you move around, since they're never drawn over. The original Marathon games exhibited this 'hall of mirrors' effect.
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Crater Creator

Post Jan 10th '15, 17:32

Hi,

Thanks for all the input folks. Much appreciated. I'm a newb so for the most part, I'm just seeking how to actually do it using the tools I mentioned in my post. After hours of playing I figured it out. For other newbs, I have posted a video tutorial here:

http://youtu.be/-mrGiflSAuQ

on my youtube Marathon Tutorial page. I'm hoping to add more (in relation to my published Marathon Map 'Big Fart').
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dustu

Post Jan 10th '15, 21:31

Have you tried using Vasara for texturing? You may find using the interface to be a bit more intuitive.

Also check out the forge video tutorials if you haven't already, which covers the basics and is still mostly applicable to using Weland. There's also Hastur's Workshop, which covers some of the mid-level tricks and techniques.
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Chocolateer

Post Aug 27th '15, 23:08

Hi,

More recently I have used Vasara and I have to say I really like it. Very cool. I'll put a demo of that up too when I get around to it and post the link here also. :)

Chocolateer wrote:Have you tried using Vasara for texturing? You may find using the interface to be a bit more intuitive.

Also check out the forge video tutorials if you haven't already, which covers the basics and is still mostly applicable to using Weland. There's also Hastur's Workshop, which covers some of the mid-level tricks and techniques.
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dustu


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