Oculus Rift support for Aleph One

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treellama
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There are some remnants of Cybermaxx headset support and stereoscopic rendering in the Marathon 2 source. It should be pretty straightforward for someone with good programming skills to get it working for solo play.

You need to find someone with:The Dev kitProgramming abilityTime/interestUnfortunately, I only satisfy one of those requirements. But, I'll be happy to answer Aleph One specific questions if someone steps up to do it.
Last edited by treellama on Aug 27th '12, 16:08, edited 1 time in total.
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Blastfrog
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I have the devkit on its way in the mail, as well as free time and interest. I'm not the best at coding, but I can get it to do what I want.
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RyokoTK
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The Oculus Rift isn't a joke?
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Destiny
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Now all we need is a replica of the Security Officer's helmet with the Oculus Rift as the visor and we can all live the life of a space marine!

I actually have an article about Oculus Rift in one of my recent Gameinformer magazines. I found the technology to be quite interesting. I wish I had a headset to see how the vision is like, but aren't headsets kind of expensive?
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Blastfrog
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300 dollars, just 15 for shipping. A bit pricey, sure, but affordable, and very low cost for what it is/does.
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Asylum
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Destiny wrote:Now all we need is a replica of the Security Officer's helmet with the Oculus Rift as the visor and we can all live the life of a space marine!

I actually have an article about Oculus Rift in one of my recent Gameinformer magazines. I found the technology to be quite interesting. I wish I had a headset to see how the vision is like, but aren't headsets kind of expensive?


Answer: You will never own one, and if you do you'll look hilarious with it on.
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I had the chance to try the Oculus Rift this week. It was set up to play Team Fortress 2. It's always sounded cool, and it seems like it's got enough traction to actually succeed where others like it have failed.

But actually playing it was underwhelming. You take a big hit in effective resolution. It's not just that it doesn't look pretty, but I had trouble telling a character's class or team at medium to long range, which is critical information in Team Fortress 2.

It was novel to look all around as if my real head was attached to my character's body. But turning your head wasn't particularly useful, because it's still the mouse and keyboard that determine which way is forward and where you'll shoot. I suppose the closest analogy to Marathon would be glancing: neat idea and useful in a handful of cases, but not something you'd actually leverage very often.

Perhaps there's a better way to do the controls that could get more of that one-to-one, almost out of body experience, but I'd have to think about how. With that said, it was very smooth. Turning my head to look around was seamless and natural, with no distortion.

The headset is heavy, but not uncomfortable or hot, like poorly designed headphones can be for instance. Ironically I felt like I had tunnel vision; like I should be able to see 'around' the black edges of my vision to see the rest of the scene. This is either because the screen's field of view was still far below natural sight, or because the hood around the sides was blocking the view. Or maybe it's because it still doesn't track your eye movements, so it's positioned under the assumption the viewer's eyes always look straight ahead.

Of course I wouldn't discourage Oculus Rift support for Aleph One. But I think among other things, the 9-bit precision on facing angle would destroy the sense of looking around in a natural way. Recently Hopper described how drawing the world and calculating what's visible are two stages decoupled from each other in the engine. I wonder if there's potential to likewise separate the camera angle at which the game is rendered from the angle the player is considered to be facing.

That last point also occurred to me in the last discussion of mouse acceleration. Aiming with the mouse still 'feels weird' to me, and I think it's the low precision of turning speed rather than the low precision of facing angle. In other words, no matter how sensitive the mouse is, turning the character changes in big jumps from turning slow to turning fast, without enough granularity to feel smooth. Again, I wonder if what the game renders could be decoupled from the angle the player is facing, since the latter needs to stay as it is to not throw off gameplay. I realize that would be weird in another sense, that you'd no longer be aiming at the direct center of the screen, but the tradeoff for smoothing out mouselook may be worth trying it.
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