Aleph One and Mavericks

Have a question, suggestion, or comment about Aleph One's features and functionality (Lua, MML, the engine itself, etc)? Post such topics here.
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radioskip
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Just upgraded to OSX Mavericks and the latest version of AO 1.1 won't run.... an older version didn't either. Was trying to play Marathon phoenix 1.2.1 on an Macbook Pro (2011 model).... Any ideas anyone? Anyone else got the same problem? Any help would be appreciated.

BTW the error message i get reads "Alephone can't be opened because it is from an unidentified developer"
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treellama
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If you right click (or control click) on Aleph One, a contextual menu will appear. Choose "Open" from the menu, and it will bypass the Gatekeeper security for that app.

Apple charges $99/year to sign applications to run on the new OS, and forbids developers from sharing signing certificates, which is a real inconvenience for open source projects.
radioskip
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Thanks a lot Treellama, I got it working. Thats crap that Apple charges for apps to run on Mavericks.... At least I can still play AO/Marathon! Thanks again.
ChristTrekker
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treellama wrote:If you right click (or control click) on Aleph One, a contextual menu will appear. Choose "Open" from the menu, and it will bypass the Gatekeeper security for that app.
What crap! Apple's getting just as bad as MS, if it's not already. Does this work for all apps?

Does this replace the "this application was downloaded from the internet" FUD dialog?
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treellama
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It's actually a setting in system preferences. You can choose to allow apps downloaded from:
  • Mac App Store
  • Mac App Store and identified developers
  • Anywhere
In Lion through Mavericks, the default is the second option, but you can bypass it on an app-by-app basis by right clicking as I noted above.
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herecomethej2000
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I was wondering how you guys got around that, and who would fork over that much loot. then I realized I had turned that off in my system preferences long ago so I didn't notice that you actually hadn't. :)

It really is an inconvenience. I have been working on porting a gtk app version of the Linux chess gui Xboard, and was looking at that. Even if I did want to fork over that much loot to convenience a few people, it wouldn't be my place to put it in my name. And wouldn't match the licensing.
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Crater Creator
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treellama wrote:It's actually a setting in system preferences. You can choose to allow apps downloaded from:
  • Mac App Store
  • Mac App Store and identified developers
  • Anywhere
In Lion through Mavericks, the default is the second option, but you can bypass it on an app-by-app basis by right clicking as I noted above.
Odd. I'm running 10.7.5 and I don't remember having to set this. I do remember having to make it not hide ~/Library, which is similarly inconvenient with regards to Aleph One.

But a system where applications don't run unless Apple whitelists them, that's more troubling. It's good the user can change it, of course. But that's the polar opposite of "it just works." By default it just doesn't work, unless someone pays Apple to make it otherwise. [MDown]
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herecomethej2000
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You set this on your own. Its in the Security Panel of Preferences. Default is that it does work providing you right click and press open. then Allow.

They have hidden the User Library, but it's pretty easy to hold alt and go to to the GO Menu, where it will pop up for you.

I have to agree on the $100 thing, It seems like apple is applying it's iron strangle hold that it has with tablets/phones to the PC world which has 30+ years history of personal freedom behind it. But I see the purpose, making it even more difficult for malware to take hold through the benefits of a closed system. There are plenty of non computer literate people who definitely benefit from it. As a whole though, as long as the closed system is optional I don't mind too much and seems like a good compromise.
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