"Game of Fear" Capture the Flag strategies.

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RyokoTK
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Game of Fear is a CTF map from the pack Magenta Filter. The kicker about Game of Fear is that it's a horrendously complex map that requires a lot of studying and attention just to figure out where stuff is.

Game of Fear




Most of the time, whenever I play people on this map, the opposing team has absolutely no idea what's going on and quickly gets the stuffing knocked out of them. The purpose of this topic is to help identify key issues in this map so that people at least know what they're doing.

Each of my subsequent posts will contain a section of the guide.
Last edited by RyokoTK on Mar 31st '07, 02:51, edited 1 time in total.
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RyokoTK
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Base Outline



The above image is the overhead view of the red base. The blue base is on the north end of the map.

Spawn Points -- When you die, you respawn in a very small room not visible on the map. There are two teleporters in this room. One is going to be red, and one is going to be blue. The teleporter that is your team's color spawns you in your flag room; the teleporter that is the opposite team's color spawns you on your outer wall. If you are red, taking the red teleporter puts you on the red dot by the red flag, and taking the blue teleporter takes you to one of the three blue dots.
Main Entry -- The main entrance is where almost all attackers end up entering your base. It's noted by the stairs that extend out into the midfield. When I refer to "main entry" in future posts, this is what I mean. The room that the main entry leads into is the outer defense.
1 -- These side lifts are hard to see in-game, but know that they're there, along the outer edges of each base's outer wall. The benefit of these lifts is that you get a slightly stealthier entrance into the base, and you don't have to go through the main entry. However, you still have to pass through the outer room just south of the entry, so you don't get any super-sneaky ways in. This area is known as the lifts.
2 -- These sniper towers are only easily accessible by spawning on them. They have essentially unlimited SMG ammo, which means that skilled defenders can effectively punish enemy attackers, but most people don't do much damage here. They can be reached by strafe-jumping from point 4. These are the sniper towers.
3 -- This minor ledge overlooks the outer defense. It's not used much in itself, but one of the sneakier paths reached from the lifts leads here. This is the side ledge.
4 -- This elevated tower in the middle of each base is a great place to stage a sneaky attack on the flag. It's accessed by two ways: the long horizontal stairwell from the outer defense, or the side lift from point 5. Sneaky attackers almost always hang out here, at least for a time. This is known as the upper deck.
5 -- This side passage is only easily accessible from the flag room, but it can also be accessed from the upper deck or even by grenade hopping from the side ledge. It provides an unexpected way into the flag room as well as a more obscure way out. This is known as the back street.
6 -- While 6 itself denotes a 1x shield recharger, the hallway that it's in is known as main street because almost all less-experienced attackers choose this path to enter the flag room. It makes sense; it's very obvious and it's the most direct path there, which is beneficial for speedy flag-runners, but obviously is the most expected way to go and thus the most likely to encounter resistance.
RF denotes the Red Flag (and BF, in the blue base, denotes the blue flag). This is the flag room, and is the ultimate convergence point for all enemy attackers.
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RyokoTK
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Defense

Defense in Capture the Flag is broken down into three basic sub-categories: outer defense, inner defense, and flag recovery.

Outer Defense



There are four primary means of enemies breaking through the outer defense, denoted by the different-colored lines.
Blue is the most common way of attack, and the easiest to defend against. Attackers will charge straight up through the main entry, pass through the outer defense room, and down main street. Thus, it's the most exposed and most obvious way of attack.
Cyan is a little more rare; enemies will run up the stairs to the upper deck, and then stage their attack from there. If you time it right, you can intercept them as they climb up the stairs, or go behind them and blow them away with the Shotguns or SMG. While it's tough to deal with them once they actually make it up there, it's a very vulnerable passage to get there.
Teal is also uncommon; it has people using the lift that leads to the side ledge, and then jumping down into the outer defense room, continuing on through either the blue or cyan paths. While the enemy does circumvent the main entry this way, they still have to pass through the outer defense. Beware, however! It is possible to grenade-hop at the magenta dot up to the back street, thus circumventing the outer defense room altogether. Keep your eyes open!
Gold is probably the least common. Someone hugging the sniper tower there can sneak right past someone defending around point 1. However, from there, they almost always go down the blue path, or occasionally up the cyan one.

What all of these have in common (except for the grenade-hop path) is that they all have to pass through the outer defense in some fashion. Because of this, a good defender will probably opt to defend out here, rather than in the flag room (as is traditional with other maps). The two most beneficial points to stand on defense out here are points 1 and 2, which each have their own pros and cons.

1 allows the defender to see all the way across the midfield into the enemy's outer defense. It also means that, as long as the defender stairs out into the field, they should see everyone coming to attack, and have ample warning to prepare themselves. There's also a nice pile of shotgun shells that spawns right at the top step, and missiles a bit further back. Furthermore, a good shot with the shotguns can completely eliminate enemies before they even reach your base, or at least do hefty damage to them. The only downside is that there's no cover and no ambush factor, meaning that:
a) enemies know you're there before they get there
b) you can be shot by enemies camping in their sniper towers

2 removes the chance of being shot by enemy snipers, as well as providing you with the ambush. You can still see anyone who takes any of those four main paths, and you can even see someone who grenade-hops up into the back street. You also have quick access to the flag room should someone do just that, or somehow slip by you otherwise. It's a good spot to camp, but it has its downsides as well:
a) you have less time to react when enemies get through the (now undefended) main entry
b) ammo is a little more out of reach
c) you lose the sniping advantage




Ultimately, neither of those options is that much more beneficial than the other, and both of them are prime defense points.
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RyokoTK
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Inner Defense



Generally, it's a better idea to defend on the outer defense area. However, if you get killed by an attacker on the outer defense, it's a very good idea to quickly respawn in the inner defense, which is done by taking your team-color's teleporter (i.e. if you're red team, take the red teleporter; if you're blue, take blue).

Defense in the flag room here is more difficult because you can't really see where attackers are coming from and there's less space. There are three main methods of entry into the flag room:

Blue is the main path from main street. This path probably covers 75% of attacks on its own, so if you're on defense, it's best to expect an attack from this path. You won't have much warning, however, as you can't really see them coming until they're there.

If the enemy managed to sneak up onto the upper deck, then he will attack from one of two paths: the cyan path, which is basically an airborne version of the blue path, or the teal path. While attacks from the teal path are fairly rare, due to the relative difficulty of reaching the back street, it is possible and thus shouldn't be ruled out.

There are two factors that should also be considered when playing inner defense:

The magenta line is basically a sniper window from the upper deck. Enemies cannot cross this line, as the ceiling is too low, but they can see you and can also damage you if you're standing close to the flag. Keep an eye on your motion sensor; if you think they're up there, get close to the upper deck and look for movement.

The yellow pillars that basically shield the flag. While they can block your vision of the main enemy paths, they can also give you vital shelter should a gunfight break out in here. Do not neglect these pillars as shelter, but also make sure your view of the attack routes is as clear as possible. That means don't stand on top of the flag.
Last edited by RyokoTK on Mar 31st '07, 01:54, edited 1 time in total.
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Flag Recovery



The enemy managed to break through your defense, kill off most of your team, and steal the flag from you. At this point, it's important that you recover the flag before they score the point.

Because of the way the map is laid out, it is very rare that an attacker will take the same path out that they did in. It's much easier (and wiser) to keep moving basically forward and take a generally opposite path. The three paths out, however, are basically the same as the paths in.

The important thing in flag recovery is intercepting the flag-carrier. This is most easily done by waiting for him in the outer defense region, as you should be able to see which path the flag-carrier took. While it's fairly uncommon for the flag-carrier to actually pass through the outer defense, it's still a good advance vantage point, and you will be able to get several free shots on the enemy as he crosses back around the exposed midfield.

One thing to note:
The teal path is airborne, as the enemy will be jumping down from the upper deck. It is conceivably possible, but unlikely, that the flag-carrier has jumped over to the sniper towers and is jumping down from there. More often than not, however, the enemy will basically jump through the main entry and land somewhere in the midfield. Keep an eye on the sky and your motion sensor and take him down with the SMG or Shotguns.
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RyokoTK
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The Midfield



This is the midfield: the neutral ground between the red base to the south and the blue base to the north. As you can see, there is no cover here, and it's the lowest point on the map. Spend as little time as humanly possible out here.

Some notes:
1) The lava is almost completely harmless. It's only an inch deep, and not very far to cross. Don't limit yourself to crossing the bridges, as it's not really necessary.
2) Try not to cross the midfield in the direct center. Hug the walls, especially the enemy's outer wall. It's difficult to be seen there, and you have safe, obscure access to the lifts.
3) There is some SPNKR ammo on the side walls, and more ammo to be had on the outer walls of the bases themselves, but overall there isn't much to be had. Stock up before you leave.
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RyokoTK
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Offense



Breaking into the enemy base is difficult to do safely, and almost impossible to do unseen. The chance of there not being anyone either in the sniper towers, along the outer wall, or in the main entry area is basically zero, so expect opposition as soon as you step in the midfield. However, there are some ways, with a bit of strategy, to elude defenders and confuse them enough to grab the flag unexpectedly.

There are four main paths of attack.

Red, as I've explained, is the least-safe for the attacker, as anyone who knows the map expects enemies to go down this path. The benefit of it, however, is that it's the fastest path and certainly the most convenient. If you think you're up to the task of brazenly charging through their ranks, this is the path you want to take. The benefit of it is that it's short and free of obstruction; however, once you take this path, there's no turning back, and there's no cover at all.

A spin on the red route is the gold route, which has the advantage of bypassing the main entry (as well as most of the outer defense entirely), but the disadvantage of having to go over to that lift to do so. Any defenders standing in the main entry will also know what you have done. It doesn't cut a lot of time off of the red route, but it gives you a bit of stealth (and lets you skip the stairs!). You can also use it to quickly go up the dark red route.

Dark Red is basically the path of choice for sneaky snakes. Once you clear the outer defense and gain entry to the upper deck, the enemy is almost certainly not going to pursue you, which means you have time and safety on your side. On top of that, you have what's probably the safest way into the flag room, and you can see what's going on in their base. The problem with it is that it's a pain in the neck to reach, and the stairs leading up to it are horribly unsafe, as there's no room to dodge. The stairs themselves are hard to see unless you know they're there:



Once you've gained access to the upper deck, and you're pretty sure nobody's about to come up after you, keep an eye on the enemy flag room until your chance comes (by looking through the north windows) and then jump down, either along the east or west edge of the deck. Be cautious, however: low-hanging ceilings have intentionally been placed to block your way in this regard, so you can't quite swoop down on the flag. But you still have the advantage of surprise, and less distance to go on foot.

If you're looking for one more spin on the attack, you can always go up the magenta path. If you're a dirty scoundrel, you can grenade-hop up the ledge at the cyan dot; otherwise, you will still have to jump down and pass through the enemy's outer defense. However, it's a good idea to mix up your attacks so stealth is at least a little bit on your side.
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Escape



Once you've grabbed the flag, you still need to escape with it alive. The problem with this is that any enemies you have killed while getting in have certainly respawned by now, and will try to prevent you from getting back out. On top of that, anyone you haven't killed is going to be hot on your heels in pursuit. Therefore, getting back out takes at least as much skill, deception, and strategy as getting in did in the first place. There are three main paths to get back out, with several sub-options. Since this is probably the most tense moment for the player, every benefit is going to count for you.

Taking the red path out is going to be the easiest. If you entered the blue base from the west, it's generally the easiest and most sensible path to take the east path out so you're still basically running straight. In this manner, the red path is fairly safe and speedy. Anyone who's in direct pursuit will probably be delayed slightly by the elevator that you take to get out, and you'll be shielded by several pillars and walls, therefore making you vulnerable only once you enter that bastard midfield. Do not take the dark red offshoot of this path, as you don't save much time, but you do lose a lot of cover, and you get dangerously close to the enemy's outer defense. Avoiding that is a good idea, as that is where they will be gathering to intercept you.

Building off of that, the magenta path is a bad idea, unless you are ballsy, or you're almost certain the outer defense is going to be empty. It's basically the most direct path out of the base, but because you absolutely have to pass through the main entry, you're putting yourself at great risk. If you passed through the main entry on your way in and cleared it out, it might be worth the risk, but you never know if the enemy has respawned out here (and they probably did).

For sneaky snakes, you still have the yellow path, which puts you back up on the upper deck. Again, this is beneficial, and almost certainly the safest way out. It's difficult for anyone to follow you, you get to completely circumvent the outer defense by jumping right over it, and it's unlikely anyone will be there to intercept you. The only disadvantage is that it's slow, so if anyone is waiting for you in the midfield (and you've given them good time to do so), you're basically screwed as you're a clear shot while in the air. The tan and gold offshoots go over the enemy sniper towers, which can be reached by strafe-jumping over the corners of the upper deck. This is a little tricky to do, but makes you much safer as you go over the midfield.
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General Notes

1) Don't get too defensive. You do not want to sacrifice offense for defense, as without an offense, you can't score. Also, your team's attackers respawning will serve as a temporary additional defense. In my experience, it's only taken one person on permanent defense to keep the flag base reasonably secure. Besides, if the enemy grabs the flag, everyone will know it, and be able to turn around and help intercept.

2) Coordinate your attacks, but do not attack in swarms. Have someone storm the main entry, and have someone else sneak up the lifts while the defense is busy. You can outflank a single defender in the base (provided they're right at the main entry, not backed up somewhere else). Have someone take the main street while someone else jumps over the upper deck, thus also confusing anyone on inner defense.

3) Stock up before you leave the base, not once you get to the enemy's.

4) Weapon choices!
a) The Assault Rifle is not going to be too much help, except on inner defense, where space is tight and the AR's constant fire will benefit you. However, you'll always have it as a backup (since you basically spawn on top of it).
b) The Alien Weapon can be safely neglected.
c) For offense, I like to use the Shotguns. The SPNKR runs the risk of a suicide, which, on offense in CTF, doesn't do you a lick of good. There's a decent amount of Shotgun ammo lying around, and it's very fatal, minimizing the time spent in a fight. However, it's easier to hit enemies with the SPNKR as well. Ultimately, I would leave this up to player preference.
d) For outer defense, the Shotguns are certainly the best. You can use it to damage enemies crossing the midfield, and you can also put suppressing fire down on enemy snipers, should they have any. There's also a very convenient stash of shotgun ammo right there at the top of the main entry stairs.
e) For flag recovery, if you have a steady arm, nothing will beat the SMG in effectiveness. As flag-carriers tend to run straight to get to safety the fastest, that leaves them very open to SMG fire. Also, flag-carriers are usually partially injured, so the chance of a quick kill with the SMG is greatly multiplied.

5) Don't snipe. It doesn't do any good.




I hope this guide was some help to anyone who keeps getting blown away on this map. I understand that it's a confusing and unnecessarily complex map, but it is a good one, and it gets played fairly often, so it's good to know these things.
December Wolves
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My opinion: A map that requires memorising three A4 pages of .12 font sized instructions to play, huh? Fun.

Putting "my opinion" before a statement that had been deleted for trolling doesn't make the statement any less troll-some. What was I thinking?
Last edited by December Wolves on Mar 31st '07, 13:30, edited 1 time in total.
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screamingfool
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The level doesn't require a manual, it plays great. Ryoko just likes to write extra curricular essays about his maps, and well just about everything marathon. Noobs on the server have a way of wrecking everything, if they were to read this they might offer a good game, i doubt they will, but Ryoko is giving you the benefit of the doubt. Why don't you bug the shit out of someone else for a while?

bring it.
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LegacyTyphoon
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December Wolves wrote:My opinion: A map that requires memorising three A4 pages of .12 font sized instructions to play, huh? Fun.
I believe it's assumed that the reader is smart enough to know that this whole guide is:
A) One way to play the map
B) That there are other successful ways to play the map
The Pf'hak - Read it.
Science technology jargon physics.
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Neanderthal
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Wow, I've never seen a map dissection like this before. I, as someone who has never played, or even seen the map, this was a very nice introduction to it. Very impressive. [MSmile]
"Yes! That's right! The answer is 'Wisconsin'! Another 50 points for God, and ... uh-oh, looks like Norman, our current champion hasn't even scored yet."
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Sam Lowry
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Mb we can have it animated next time too?
http://vismod.media.mit.edu/vismod/demos/f...all/playrec.htm
shawn(at)fsu: My nephew wants to start doing game modding ...
hux: If he likes Halo, try modding for Marathon, the older Bungie fps game.
interkin3tic: Noooo!!! I did that in high school and look where I am now: SLASHDOT!!!
........
W: it's long and obnoxious, i like it
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